Veterinary Department Updates

  • 18 Dec 2020
    FEI Veterinarians Update

    Please find attached updates about:

    Competency-based Evaluation System
    New Certificates
    Disclosures Declaration
    Veterinary Courses and Registration
    Education System and Applications for Promotion
    New levels
    Elective Testing
    EADCM Sampling Forms
    Social Media Guidelines
    Season's Greetings

  • 18 Dec 2020
    FEI warning regarding contaminated batches of feed - Caffeine

    The FEI would like to warn the equestrian community that some batches of Marstall feed containing apple pomace were contaminated with caffeine, a Controlled Medication and Specified Substance on the FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List.

    Bernhard Kreiling GmbH, the manufacturer of Marstall, identified apple pomace, an ingredient in the feed, to be the source of contamination. Measures have been taken by Bernhard Kreiling GmbH to prevent further contamination with caffeine and other substances derived from caffeine. Feed produced since 14 July 2020, i.e. batch numbers 219301, 219302, 219303 and 219304 onwards, should be unaffected. The FEI recommends that anyone using this feedstuff should carefully check the batch numbers and contact the manufacturers if they have any concerns.

    The FEI recommends that samples are kept from batches of feed and supplements given to competition horses to enable a thorough investigation to be carried out should contamination be suspected.

    Under the FEI Regulations, from 1 January 2021 it will be possible for horses to be tested for caffeine under the Elective Testing scheme. Since caffeine is listed as a Specified Substance, from 1 January 2021 any finding will be treated as an Atypical Finding.

    Further information concerning contamination prevention can be found here.

  • 22 Oct 2020
    Feed contamination alert - Zilpaterol

    In follow-up to our communique of 7 October 2020 (see below), the British Horseracing Authority has been made aware that the products of several other equine feed companies, besides GAIN Equine Nutrition, may also have been affected by the shipment of contaminated molasses suspected of containing the banned substance Zilpaterol.
    We understand that the companies in question are contacting customers directly to advise on the batches that may have been affected and to replace the contaminated feed.
    Anyone contacted by their supplier should follow their advice and, if required, stop feeding any potentially affected product immediately. They should also ensure that all feed equipment (bowls, scoops, bins etc.) that may have contained any contaminated product is cleaned thoroughly with detergent and plenty of water.

    In line with our previous advice, it is strongly advised that horses that may have inadvertently ingested Zilpaterol are withdrawn from competition.

    Further information on contamination prevention can be found here.

  • 7 Oct 2020
    FEI notice on Zilpaterol feed contamination

    The FEI would like to inform the equestrian community about a feedstuff contamination with Zilpaterol, a Banned Substance on the Equine Prohibited Substances List, following an alert from feed producer GAIN Equine Nutrition advising its equine customers to refrain from feeding their current stock of GAIN Equine products.
    On 2 October 2020, the French horse racing authority France Galop announced that five horses had tested positive to Zilpaterol. The substance appears to have derived from the ingestion of contaminated feed. 
    Zilpaterol is a beta-agonist drug used as a feed additive to increase muscle mass in beef cattle. It can also improve lung function. A number of countries prohibit its use in food producing animals.
    The FEI recommends that samples are kept of batches of feed and supplements given to competition horses to enable a thorough investigation to take place should the horse test positive for Zilpaterol.
    Under the FEI Regulations, it is not possible for horses to be tested for Zilpaterol under the Elective Testing scheme as it is a Banned Substance.
    It is strongly advised that horses that may have inadvertently ingested Zilpaterol are withdrawn from competition.
    Further information on contamination prevention can be found here.
    The latest updates from GAIN on this issue are available here.

  • 11 Sep 2020
    FEI Veterinarians Update

    Please find attached updates about:

    • Call for scenarios
    • Equine Asthma webinar
    • Veterinary Covid-19 guidelines
  • 11 Sep 2020
    FEI Veterinarians Update

    Please find attached updates about:

    • Equine Asthma webinar
    • Veterinary Covid-19 guidlines

     

  • 28 Apr 2020
    African Horse Sickness outbreak in Thailand – update

    The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) was notified on 27 March by the Department of Livestock Development (DLD), the veterinary authority of Thailand, of an outbreak of African Horse Sickness (AHS) in the Pak Chong district, Nakorn in the north-east of the country. In the initial notification, 341 horses were reported susceptible, of which 62 were confirmed infected. Out of these 62 horses, 42 are reported to have died.

    Up to 28 April, outbreaks have been confirmed in seven provinces, with a total of 1,829 susceptible horses, of which 394 have died out of 438 confirmed cases.

    As a result of the outbreak, the OIE has suspended the AHS-free status of Thailand.

    AHS is spread by insect vectors such as midges, some types of mosquitos and ticks. All species of equidae can be infected by the disease. Horses and mules often die from the infection, while donkeys are much less susceptible and zebras rarely show clinical signs. The disease can be caused by any of nine serotypes of the virus. This outbreak has been caused by serotype 1.

    Please visit the OIE website for more information on AHS.

    Having been briefed by DLD, the Thailand Equestrian Federation (TEF) immediately took measures, restricting movement of horses by their members. The Federation is also in contact with the FEI Veterinary Department and Jack Huang, FEI Vice President and Chair of FEI Regional Group VIII. TEF has reported that Equestrian horses have not been as badly impacted by the outbreak as racehorses.

    DLD initially reported that the following measures were taken:
    • Movement control inside the country
    • Surveillance outside containment and/or protection zone
    • Surveillance within containment and/or protection zone
    • Quarantine
    • Zoning
    • Disinfection
    • Control of vectors
    • Vector surveillance
    • Vaccination permitted (if a vaccine exists)
    • No treatment of affected animals

    The OIE arranged a webinar on 28 April during which DLD presented their strategy to eradicate the virus. Key elements are zoning and strategic vaccination using a South African vaccine aimed at regaining the country’s AHS-free status. Countries in the region have increased their preparedness for a further spread of the disease with vector protection, increased surveillance and restriction of movement of horses.

    The FEI is working closely with its partners – the OIE and the International Federation of Horse Racing Authorities (IFHA) under the umbrella body, the International Horse Sport Confederation (IHSC) – to support the Thai authorities and sport horse industry to stop this outbreak. The OIE arranges technical webinars that are well attended by private and public stakeholders.

  • 17 Apr 2020
    FEI Veterinarians Update

    Please find attached updates about:

    • The International Society of Equine Locomotor Pathology (ISELP)
    • African Hor Sickness Outbreak in Thailand
    • FEi Eventing Risk Management Forum
    • Applications for Veterinary Course Director are now Open
    • Veterinary Courses and Competency-based Evaluation System
    • FEI Hyposensitivity Control System
  • 1 Apr 2020
    African Horse Sickness outbreak in Thailand

    The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) was notified on 27 March by the Department of Livestock Development (DLD), the veterinary authority of Thailand, of an outbreak of African Horse Sickness (AHS) in the Pak Chong district, Nakorn in the north-east of the country. In the initial notification, 341 horses were reported susceptible, of which 62 were confirmed infected. Out of these 62 horses, 42 are reported to have died.

    A further two outbreaks were reported to the OIE on 3 April. One outbreak occurred in Hua Hin district, in the Prachuap Khiri Khan province where 10 horses out of a group of 15 susceptible horses have died. In the Ko Chan district of the Chon Buri province, there were 33 susceptible horses of which 6 were infectious. Five out of the 6 horses died.

    As a result of the outbreak, the OIE has suspended the AHS-free status of Thailand.

    AHS is spread by insect vectors such as midges and some types of mosquitos and ticks. All species of equidae can be infected by the disease. Horses and mules often die from the infection, while donkeys are much less susceptible and zebras rarely show clinical signs. The disease can be caused by any of nine serotypes of the virus. The serotype in this outbreak has not yet been communicated by DLD.

    Please visit the OIE website for more information on AHS.

    Having been briefed by DLD, the Thailand Equestrian Federation immediately took measures, restricting movement of horses by their members. The Federation is also in close contact with the FEI Veterinary Department and Jack Huang, FEI Vice President and Chair of FEI Regional Group VIII.

    DLD has reported that the following measures have been taken:
    • Movement control inside the country
    • Surveillance outside containment and/or protection zone
    • Surveillance within containment and/or protection zone
    • Quarantine
    • Zoning
    • Disinfection
    • Control of vectors
    • Vector surveillance
    • Vaccination permitted (if a vaccine exists)
    • No treatment of affected animals

    The FEI is working closely with its partners – the OIE and the International Federation of Horse Racing Authorities (IFHA) under the umbrella body, the International Horse Sport Confederation (IHSC) – to support the Thai authorities and sport horse industry to stop this outbreak.

  • 7 Jan 2020
    Veterinarian - Glanders

    ​An outbreak of Glanders has been contained on the island of Büyükada, the largest of the nine Princes’ Islands off Istanbul (TUR). Turkish authorities culled 81 horses on the island in December, barred the entry and exit of animals on the island and have also banned the use of horse-drawn carriages on Büyükada for a three-month period to prevent the spread of the disease. A further three outbreaks have been reported in the provinces of Bolu in the north west of the country and Uşak in the interior part of the Aegean region, resulting in an additional 11 horses being culled by the Turkish authorities. 

    As glanders is a notifiable disease, the Turkish authorities formally notified the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) of the outbreaks on 23 and 31 December. The FEI and European Equestrian Federation (EEF) were informed of the initial outbreak in Büyükada by the Turkish National Head Veterinarian on 19 December. As the outbreaks have been contained and all necessary biosecurity measures have been implemented, there is no impact on FEI events at this point, but the Turkish authorities are continuing to provide regular updates to the FEI and the EEF. There was a previous outbreak of glanders in Turkey two years ago.

    Glanders is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Burkholderia mallei. It primarily affects equidae (horses, donkeys and mules), but the bacteria that cause glanders can be transmitted to humans through contact with tissues or body fluids of infected animals. There is currently no vaccine against glanders, but strict biosecurity measures are an effective preventative. Control depends on early detection and humane destruction of seropositive animals to stop the spread of the disease.

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